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Self-Neglect More Prevalent Amongst Self-Employed Hairdressers

It is highly likely, that most of you reading this article are self-employed or thinking of it in the near future. Kudos to you! It is nothing short of bravery to wear the Armour of Self-Employed.

You may have inherited a family business. You maybe one of the early self discovered individuals who never had the interest to work for a boss. You may have worked in a corporate job before and lost your employment status or simply chose to leave of your own cognizance. Whatever the situation, you are now self-employed.

Here are the Stats:

  • 4 Nearly 15 million Americans are self-employed. A report from last year found that 14.6 million people, or about 10 percent of the active workforce in 2014, were self-employed. (source: Pew Research Center – Sep 1, 2016)
  • The number of unincorporated self-employed people still remains high, with more than 1.5 million Canadians or nine per cent of the total workforce in 2014 registered as unincorporated self-employed people. (source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/business/self-employment-study-1.3262831)

What does being self-employed represented to you in the beginning?

I think for most people it is a sense of freedom to create, flexibility to choose how much or how little you work and definitely the authority to be the decision making persona.

Now that you are self-employed – what changed? The reality is that self-employed individuals – especially women, who are mothers and wives are juggling several priority lists. That’s not to say that men aren’t muddled up as well but in a lot of cases; men focus on building their business and the “extras” are re-directed to their significant other.

A sad revelation is that you have yet to experience the freedom which you envisioned. You keep thinking – one day…once I get my business to a certain level…when I make $$$…or any number of reasons why this freedom is somewhere in the future. I see a lot of beauty professionals who are experiencing the “I work all the time, every day of the week” syndrome, because they cannot afford to take a break. Weekends are becoming a regular work day.

The result is self neglect. 

You need to go see your doctor or your dentist. Your desperately need to go see your hairdresser. Are you thinking about these things? Absolutely! Are you recognizing that you need to do it sooner than later? Definitely! Are you prioritizing it? Highly unlikely!  Hairdressers, included!

What else gets onto the neglected list:

  • Good nutrition
  • Physical activity
  • Coffee chats with friends
  • Personal grooming
  • Calmness of mind
  • Lack of sleep

How does your self neglect affect the professionals?

Your personal neglect is shifting how business is conducted in the salon. I can speak from this perspective as a hair stylist. Self-employed individuals cannot afford the time required for personal grooming, therefore they are resorting to “do-it-yourself” methods or are seeking alternative early morning, late evening or weekend services.

This group of self-employed individuals are continuously multi-tasking. When they are finally in the salon they are barely “present” to the current activity. This in itself is a huge challenge for hairdressers because the clients head is not in the right position physically especially with a cell phone in hand.

Why is it Important to carve out time for personal grooming and be “present”? It is a precious few minutes to quiet the mind. Restore your energy and more importantly an opportunity to be taken care of. You will agree that when you feel good about your self your productivity is higher, your outlook is positive and your focus is sharper.

Self-employed clients are changing the way hairdressers work, live and conduct business. Hairdressers, are you changing your business model to stay relevant in the face of a changing economic work structure?

 

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